Reviews from American Dance Festival by Heidi Latsky

"[Soliliquy] embraces the inclusiveness of Latsky’s vision that values the grace, courage and perseverance of people with disabilities. And, this poetic, startlingly original, emotionally moving film stands alone as a work of art." —The Herald Sun

NJ Arts: Heidi Latsky Dance show at Montclair State looks to the future by Heidi Latsky

When the camera pulls back, introducing the dancers one by one in full-body shots, we see that one woman, Jen Bricker, is indeed legless. Another woman is pregnant; and the older man, Robert Simpson, leans on a cane. They are not typical dancers, yet in a magic world where no one competes for prizes or has to perform ordinary tasks like climbing stairs or unscrewing a jar-lid, these people appear equal to everyone else. They are individuals dancing along life’s path, growing and reborn from one moment to the next; and they make glamorous film stars.
— Robert Johnson, NJ Arts

Arts Journal: Beauty All Around by Heidi Latsky

Robert Simpson (L) and Jerron Herman in a still from Heidi Latsky’s filmSoliloquy. Photo: Zac Halberd

Robert Simpson (L) and Jerron Herman in a still from Heidi Latsky’s filmSoliloquy. Photo: Zac Halberd

Mysterious - and beautiful...we see heads nuzzling each other; bodies gently, sensuously tangling; tendrils of hair flying...
— Deborah Jowitt, Arts Journal

Montclair Times & NJ ARTS: Heidi Latsky's 'Triptych' premieres at Montclair by Heidi Latsky

Check it out! We're featured in the Montclair Times and NorthJersey.com!

Jerron Herman and Montclair State alum Evan Ruggiero on the set of Soliloquy, the debut film of Dance for Film on Location at Montclair State University. Photo by Charlotte Henry Jones.

Jerron Herman and Montclair State alum Evan Ruggiero on the set of Soliloquy, the debut film of Dance for Film on Location at Montclair State University. Photo by Charlotte Henry Jones.

For Jed Wheeler, who commissioned Latsky for the first film in the three-film series, Latsky “represents all of the anomalies of beauty, that our society takes for granted.” The dance is a message of inclusion, Wheeler said. “Heidi makes dances with people who are not regarded as individuals with full abilities, which is wrong. They have great abilities.”
— Gwen Orel, NorthJersey.com

NY Times Review: Heidi Latsky Dance at Montclair State University by Heidi Latsky

Heidi Latsky and Gregory Youdan Jr. in Ms. Latsky's "Triptych," at Montclair State University's Alexander Kasser Theater. Credit Andrea Mohin/The New York Times

Heidi Latsky and Gregory Youdan Jr. in Ms. Latsky's "Triptych," at Montclair State University's Alexander Kasser Theater. Credit Andrea Mohin/The New York Times

For the choreographer Heidi Latsky, there are no unbeautiful bodies and no bodies incapable of dancing. In what some might call disability, she finds possibility. In “Triptych,” which opened at the Alexander Kasser Theater at Montclair State University on Thursday as part of the Peak Performances series, she unleashes some of those possibilities in three complementary dances, one for film and two for the stage.
— Siobhan Burke, NY Times

New Jersey Stage: Heidi Latsky's Triptych makes its World Premiere at Peak Performances by Heidi Latsky

Check it out, we're featured on New Jersey Stage!

For Latsky, directing the film provided a new dimension of “why not?” As a leading “physically integrated” company, Heidi Latsky Dance includes performers with Parkinson’s and cerebral palsy, who are deaf, born without legs or whose legs have been amputated. Latsky worked with director of photography Zachary Halberd and editor Marilys Ernst to create the intimate, powerful movement portraits in the film. One of the advantages of working with film, Latsky believes, is the ability to draw attention to unexpected details that cannot otherwise be perceived. With Triptych, Latsky’s dancers continue to present “unexpected bodies in beautiful ways” and collaborate with the eye of the beholder to redefine notions of beauty and virtuosity. Triptych features original music by Chris Brierley and Xi.me.na Borges.

APAP|2015 Plenary Sessions: “The Arts as Levelers of Experience” by Heidi Latsky

Heidi participated in APAP|2015's plenary session in a series of pecha kucha-style presentations followed by a lively moderated conversation between the presenters and the audience. Other speakers included Mehmet Dede, David Lutken, Heather Raffo, and Tanya Tagaq.

View video here.

 

"People often tell me that I have changed my dancer's lives. They have changed mine. And together, we have moved out of our comfort zones, embraced a wider and more human aesthetic, and redefined for ourselves and others what dance is."

-Heidi in her speech at APAP|2015 Plenary Sessions, January 10, 2015

 

CRAINS NY: Support for Dance Companies Takes a Tumble by Heidi Latsky

"Heidi Latsky, the founder and artistic director of her eponymous dance company, said it has received varying amounts of corporate support since she founded it in 2001. However, she said, it is a tremendous challenge to reach out to corporations when there isn't a development staff to spearhead the effort. Ms. Latsky's company has a budget of around $200,000 and only recently hired an executive director, who she hopes will find a way to get in the door at corporations. "You need an 'in,' you need a contact at these companies," said Ms. Latsky.

She said she has written many companies and applied for various grants but often gets no response. That has surprised Ms. Latsky, especially as her company features disabled as well as able-bodied dancers."

- Theresa Agovino, Crain's New York Business. Read full article.

See Chicago Dance: Able-Bodied Heidi Latsky Dance by Heidi Latsky

"On the other hand, Latsky’s “Somewhere,” which implements many permutations of the song, “Over The Rainbow,” is an inspired use of diverse bodies and movement attributes to depict the human longing for transcendence.  Here she taps the unique beauty of a bent body and uneven gait, the incredibly poignant impact of a seated man opening his arms in a salutation to existence, the stunning silence and physical power of the song in American Sign Language, the out-sized gyrating jive energy of a big woman with big feelings about rainbows, the loneliness of longing in a man’s solo plea for deliverance, and the intimacy of a man and woman flying over that rainbow together. Now that’s different!"

- See Chicago Dance. Read full story. 

Beauty in Difference: Heidi Latsky Dance Returns to Chicago by Heidi Latsky

"I look for a certain physicality; I love dancers who love to move. I look for performers who are really fascinating to me, and hopefully they’ll be fascinating to others, and I look for ways to bring out their uniqueness more—and I’m not just talking about the disabled, I’m talking about everybody, myself included."

- Heidi in an interview with Newcity Stage. Read more. 

a glance at our Fall 2014 board event by Heidi Latsky

Dancers Jillian Hollis and Jerron Herman performing their duet, excerpted from Somewhere. (photo: Alena Jaffe)

Dancers Jillian Hollis and Jerron Herman performing their duet, excerpted from Somewhere. (photo: Alena Jaffe)

Dancers Jillian Hollis and Jerron Herman performing their duet, excerpted from Somewhere. (photo: Alena Jaffe)

Dancers Jillian Hollis and Jerron Herman performing their duet, excerpted from Somewhere. (photo: Alena Jaffe)

Heidi with our generous and talented board member/graphic designer Alissa Levin. (photo: Alena Jaffe)

Heidi with our generous and talented board member/graphic designer Alissa Levin. (photo: Alena Jaffe)

A room full of HLD board members, staff, performers, and supporters.  (photo: Alena Jaffe)

A room full of HLD board members, staff, performers, and supporters.  (photo: Alena Jaffe)